Saturday, January 10, 2009

ken robinson says...

that in education creativity is as important as literacy and that we educate our kids out of their creativity and that we stigmatize mistakes and teach kids to be afraid of being wrong and that education is all about the brain (and slightly to one side) and doesn't teach kids to think with their bodies and that we treat our bodies as mere vehicles for our heads and that our entire education system is deeply flawed because it was created to sustain the industrial revolution. ok. watch it here, it's the best use of the next 20 minutes you were about to dither away on facebook or whatever.

5 comments:

john chandler said...

listened to this talk a few months ago. it's great. thanks for the reminder to watch again.

cris said...

ok, so now what? any brilliant ideas? shall we start our own school?

elnellis said...

no particularly brilliant ideas, but for starters, i think this awareness impacts how we define "success" for our children and how we engage them around the way the educational system defines success. in a way, it gives parents more responsibility to foster and keep creativity alive in our kids and applaud and encourage other forms of intelligence that may not be noticed or developed at school. i know people who were told they were dumb as kids in school and so their parents treated them like that too... because teachers are educational experts.
yeah, i agree strongly that the educational system in it's entirety- at every stage in the process from kindergarden to doctoral levels- need to be rethought.
brilliant ideas welcomed.

Joy said...

thanks for sharing. i enjoyed this immensely. i don't have any brilliant ideas but agree that our focus is too narrow in the educational system. and this is coming from a science nerd! ;0) i hope little by little we can make change for the better. at the very least children should not be told they are dumb just because they don't ace school. maybe that's where the change can start, with discussion and more awareness of different shades of smarts.

Nathan said...

That was fascinating. I had the opportunity to teach several high school government classes last month, and Robinson's speech has put words to some of the feelings and observations I had leaving that experience. Thanks Phil. I hope you don't mind me linking this on my blog as well.